Bottoms Up!

A couple weeks ago, I started seeing these bees curling up their abdomens and showing off the pollen collected on their fuzzy undersides. The picture doesn’t show it well, but the curling up of the abdomen is really conspicuous. Along with this curling up, I also observed, what appeared to be, aggressive behavior to others … More Bottoms Up!

13 Butterflies

Since I am working at home this spring and summer and not doing regular field work, I am taking the opportunity to learn a little more about my urban biodiversity. I am best at butterflies and birds right now, so keeping those lists are easy. Here are the species of butterflies that I have seen … More 13 Butterflies

Learning the bees

Happy World Bee Day! Until a few years ago, I was unenlightened about bees, especially native bees. Like most people, I thought most bees were like European honey bees (Apis mellifera) – lived in hives, made tasty honey, died when they stung you, do a waggle dance to tell their friends where the good flowers … More Learning the bees

Endangered Species Day

In honor of Endangered Species Day, I ask you to consider reducing or removing your lawn. The single biggest factor to cause a species to become “endangered” is loss of habitat. Where does that habitat go? To parking lots and grocery stores and hotels and farms and suburban neighborhoods. Will removing your lawn provide habitat … More Endangered Species Day

Pollinator Meadow – Phase 3

The Field Studies in Conservation Biology class added to the pollinator meadow by filling in some gaps in our Phase 1 area by planting our greenhouse grown native species. We planted these in the early evening of May 30th and watered them regularly for the next 10 days. Photos by Josh Kouri, teaching assistant

Phase 2 – Pollinator Meadow

Mid-December we held a field day to collect and plant seeds in the second phase of our pollinator meadow at the OU Biological Station at Lake Texoma.  Students and private landowners helped to gather seeds from a nearby remnant prairie and spread them in a newly solarized patch of ground.